Posts Tagged ‘UFC’

On December 30th, 2016, many around the world watched as former female bantamweight champion, Ronda Rousey was defeated epically by current and deserved champ, Amanda Nunes. It was a flawless victory for Nunes. It was the end of an era for Rousey.

Firstly, I want to say Ronda Rousey was a great example for women in MMA. She helped fight the sexist stereotype that women don’t belong in the ring and that women can’t be warriors. Well, they’re dead wrong. I have no doubt that, at some point, Ronda will be inducted into the UFC Hall of Fame. But… for Ronda, her entire purpose was winning. Inevitably, when you lose with this as your mentality, it can be mentally devastating. She admitted on Ellen that her knockout loss to Holly Homes affected her mental health drastically

Even during her walk-in to UFC 207, despite her initial trademark Ronda Rousey face, you could see that she was not the same Ronda she used to be. In the end, she was clearly and beyond dominantly defeated, and just like before she couldn’t handle this loss. Part of this has to do with her mentality that “winning is everything.”

The day after Ronda’s loss, her mother Dr. AnnMarie De Mars posted on her personal blog:

All of those who have criticized Ronda for taking a loss so to heart, for not just ‘shrugging it off’ don’t understand that what made Ronda so successful is that she cares DEEPLY about winning to an extent that I don’t believe the average person can wrap his/her head around.

Caring deeply about something and working your hardest to achieve it doesn’t mean you make the right decisions 100% of the time. Wouldn’t it be a nicer world if it did?

The idea that “winners focus on winning, and losers focus on winners” is bullshit. A true champion employs a strategy. Part of any strategy is learning your opponent and focusing on their strengths and weakness so that you can better be prepared to deal with them.

Of course, if you are focusing on winning and not putting in the training hours to get there, then you may have a problem.

In the same fight card, Cody Garbrandt beat Dominic Cruz, who hasn’t lost in over 10 years. Not only that, he beat him fair and square in a 5-round fight with Cody being the clear victor. Cody had said that he’d been looking at Dominic since he was 12 or 13 years old. But this isn’t what people are calling “losers focus on the winners.” Cody’s focus was a goal, not a purpose. It was a goal to become a winner by beating Dominic, which is a health goal because it gives him something to work towards. Not everyone who was a champ is the best there ever was. Look at Michael Bisping, who is the current champ at 185 lbs for example. He’s not the best in the history of MMA, but he kept working and kept believing in himself and eventually the opportunity came up for him to get the belt. Yet, he is still someone who had some devastating losses. You could also compare Ronda’s reaction to her loss to how Dominic handled his loss post-fight.

With Ronda, it shows why the idea that “winners focus on winning” is dangerous. Especially in the fight industry in which there are high stress and high risk, inevitably something’s got to give. Winning cannot be your purpose. You will eventually either physically or mentally fail or lose, and facing reality then will be far more devastating than when you live as someone whose sole purpose isn’t just to win.

Adversity, loss, pain, and failure are all things I, myself have faced. Yet, I keep on pursuing my endeavors. If you cannot face the potential for loss, you are going to have serious problems reaching your goals. Winners don’t focus on winning. The sole purpose of winners isn’t winning. It is dangerous for your overall mental health if you are someone who believes this, so please stop. Winners should not focus on winning because that causes overconfidence and underestimation of the tasks or opponents in front of you.

A true champion focuses on the learning experience. Winners focus on the process of how to always be the best version of themselves. Sometimes, this means to take a loss and learn from it to be better. A true champion also knows when it’s time to stop because eventually the enemy of time always catches up and that’s a battle you cannot win. If winners focus on winning, in the end, they will be sorely disappointed how that turns out. Winners focus on learning and growth, and how to be the best version of themselves that they can. If this means you won’t be the champ or continue your infinite winning streak, as the French say, C’est La Vie!

Such is life!

*This is not a sponsored review. This is a simple recount of Borhan Jiang’s experience at this BJJ school in Taiwan.

52852_160175370687660_2773181_oIn 2009, I was a member of a team of fighters that competed in the Bangkok BJJ International Open. We were made up of members from Taiwan BJJ Academy (台灣巴西柔術學院), Evolution MMA, and Tough MMA. The team did an excellent job, training with and coaching each other throughout the tournament, and I personally won bronze in my division. I had some great memories with this institution. This is one of the most well known and established BJJ schools in Taiwan, and it can be said that this academy has truly contributed to the development of BJJ in Taiwan.

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When I trained at the school, it was located near Taipei city hall. The gym had only the essentials – mats. It was small, and since it was on the upper level, it was potentially dangerous to train in if too many members were there at once.

Now they have a new space, which is located in a huge basement. It has plenty of space, lockers, a shower room, changing rooms, and a small shop. It also has full-time staff at the front counter, so you can talk to them instead of interrupting instructors who are teaching class.

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1426135_1809666515926976_7135114262649744218_nMokto sensei takes his BJJ craft very seriously. He is not a native Chinese, but can communicate fluently and teaches BJJ in Chinese. The students at Taiwan BJJ are precise with their movements, and seem more cautious than North American fighters. Some of them also have excellent stand-up game, which is not very common in BJJ.

Generally speaking, different BJJ schools apply their BJJ differently. Some cater to competition, some cater more to self-defense training. I’d say Taiwan BJJ’s grappling style caters more toward sports BJJ and competitions. Overall, I would recommend anyone who is visiting Taiwan to train at Taiwan BJJ Academy. It is professional and friendly, and in some ways, this school still has a pioneer spirit as the first serious BJJ school in Taiwan. Come here to find other people who like to roll and train.

 

Red men challenge force protection personnel

If I had a dollar for every time a Law Enforcement officer told me that he or she was too busy to train, I believe I could buy myself a fancy steak dinner………..with deserts. Joking aside, few LE ( Law Enforcement ) officers want to train on their own time. After talking to many LE officers the from Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Canadian Border Service Agency, Vancouver Police Department, Translink police, New West Police, Buffalo City Police, Federal Corrections gave me some insight as to why they do not want to train  and add skills outside of the job.

Some of the reasons include:

  1. They are too tired to train after their shift is over
  2. They feel they are not obligated to spend their own money and time when the agency (command) should provide the necessary tools and trainings for their work
  3. They are afraid to train in systems that might or will contradict with what they are taught in the academy. They do not want to get themselves in trouble during the arrest process.
  4. They simply have no interests to train themselves
  5. Budget

 

Let’s take a look at these.

Reason 1 : I am too tired to train after my shift is over

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Policing is a tough job and, unless a person has done it before, you cannot relate to the challenges of the job both mentally and physically. First, they carry 25lb to 35 lb of police gear constantly. That alone is physically draining. Second, the night shift is just plain tough on anyone. Third, most agencies are undermanned and they often pull double shifts. Some agencies are more difficult than others because of the nature of its work. For example, in municipal forces most LE officers are trained as first responder on the scene. They are able to pass the follow-up tasks such as detective work with other departments of the same agency. That is not the case with federal agencies such as the RCMP. RCMP officers are responsible for the entire investigation of the crime and everything that is related to the crime. That puts an extra burden on their work day. These are not just jobs but ongoing, often disturbing cases.

Reason 2: They feel they are not obligated to spend their own money or time because the agency (command) should provide the necessary tools and training for their work

In the academy or depot, some argue that the police training is good for 90 % of the police work; from writing a report to a gun fight. If there is anything else more that needs to be done, the agency should provide it because that’s their job. The higher ups should come up with the training program and allow officers to train during their shift.

Reason 3: They are afraid to train in systems that will contradict with what they are taught in the academy and get themselves in trouble during the arrest process.

This logic is probably the most legit reason for officers not to want to train in systems like Krav Maga which is a highly aggressive and striking based system. Sadly, recording technology means that everything our officers do is put under the public microscope. The general public has an “untrained“ eye and judges any aggressive move such as striking as an inappropriate use of force. The public will judge a situation based on their perceptions and not from the mindset established by training. It is a sad reality that modern LE officers have to face in today’s world.

Reason 4: They simply have no interest to train themselves

I have met many good LE officers who take no interests in firearms and martial art training. One of our former students said, “ You do not want to go and spend several hours on your day off to shoot guns when you carry one 24/7. “ Many LE officers just do not have the dedication and interests to train in martial arts on their leisure time.

Reason 5: Budget

Believe or not, LE officers are well paid in Canada compared to their US counterparts. Like everyone else, they have their economical burdens such as mortgage, child support and so on. Some people just cannot justify paying a gym membership to train themselves when most of the time they are not going to use the training. Many of us live well and we can probably make a distinction between things that are wants rather than needs.

Those are legit reasons and most issues come from the agency (commands) not individual officers. However, living in this imperfect world we can only rely on ourselves to address some of the issues. After all, isn’t that what being a LE officer is all about — being the solution, not the problem?

Solutions:

  1. In the sports medicine world, LEO’s, firefighters and military personnel are known, as “ industrial athletes.” Meaning, no matter how tired they are from their shift they still have to maintain a certain fitness standard for their job. They can always choose sports like boxing and grappling that are also great cardio and muscle workouts on top of training good hand-to-hand fighting skills. Kill two birds with one stone.

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  1. I recommend that people spend their own money on extra training. Just like everything in government, most agencies only do the bare minimum. After all, just like everyone else, the department has a limited budget. For command, buying new pistols might be viewed as more important than hand-to-hand or combative training. If LEO’s are worried about their personal budgets, find out if there is a discount. Most martial art gyms and ranges offers LE/ MIL discounts ( UTKM offers 30 % off ). Some people might have skills useful for a seminar and could barter an exchange.

 

  1. If people are worried about using excessive force learned in training outside of command, the concern is legit. Consider the school and their experience working with LEO’s. They know that the more training their students have, the more likely they are able to respond effectively under stressful conditions. Better-trained first responders are more comfortable getting physical, responding faster, and staying calmer. Well-trained people become more effective during extreme stress compared to people who have less training. A reporter asked UFC champion Jon Jones once “Are you afraid of walking into ring? “ Jon Jones said “ It is my job. You don’t ask a mail man if he is afraid of walking into a post office.”

 

It is your job and you chose this route. The more prepared people are for the job, the less mistakes you are going to make.

4& 5. Marry your job with your interests and pick a hobby that is related to your work. Life is fair: everyone only has 24 hours but it is how we use that 24 hours hat makes a difference. Some cops once said that “Policing is not a job but a life-style.” We all have different hobbies: fishing, movies, running and so on. If we can choose hobbies that can enhance our ability to do our jobs, then why not ? After all, we can all go fishing when we retire.

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“ If you only have a hammer in your tool belt then every problem looks like a nail “ When LEO’s do not have the right tools to handle the dynamics of police work, it usually leads to “ excessive force “ or even “ deadly force.”

Honestly, this reasoning reflects on the agency and command; however, in this imperfect world it is usually the individual who takes on the duty to make the necessary change. Don’t fall victim to your department or command’s lack of foresight and politically inspired budget cuts. Ask a person who requires your protection and service to show-up ready to do your job. You think your training is not up to speed I pledge to “ take the steps to find the solution to those issues because otherwise, you are a liability to the public safety not an asset. “

Most importantly, work with your family and community for ways they can support you in helping you find the resources of time and money to train. We all want our LEO’s, first responders, military, and firefighters to return home safely.

Rod zilla wingrove

Rod “Zilla” Wingrove is a Local cut man working for organizations like Battlefield fight league. He has been trained by some of the best cut men in the industry like Adrian Rosenbusch. He is also a big proponent for pushing it to be mandatory for all fight leagues to have cutmen as they can not only make the fights safer for the fighters but more entertaining for the fans by allowing the fights to continue longer.

Rod doing his work Rod with Joe Rogan

Sarah “Cheesecake” Moras is a UFC fighter who fights out of Toshido MMA (Rory MacDonalds original gym) in Kelowna BC. She has a professional record of 4-2-0 with and upcoming fight at UFC Fight Night 71 on July 15th in San Diego California. She previously fought for Inviticus FC prior to joining the cast of The Ultimate Fighter Season 18: Team Rousey vs Team Tate. She made her UFC debut against Alexis Dufresne where she won by unanoumous decision due to her active fighting style. Sara always was and clearly always will be a fighter and if she can get another big win in the UFC against Jessica Andrade she has nowhere to go but up.

Jonathan Borhan and Sarah MorasOutside Toshido

The story behind her nickname “Cheesecake” was due to the fact she could not play her original song at her professional debut and thus chose the song cheesecake from the muppet show as seen below. It should be noted that Miesha Tate took the name cupcake 1 week after meeting Sarah when Sarah already had her nickname…Future Grudge Match?!?

Sarah’s Interview after her initial debut win when her opponent missed weight by 8 pounds:

Dejan Kajic is a 30 year old Pro MMA fighter born in Bosnia. He grew up during the breakup of the former Yugoslavia which was a nasty War that split the country into Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia etc… He has a professional record currently of 6-3 with 2-0 in the Battlefield Fight League. He will be fighting May 30th against Ash “Smash” Mashreghi at BFL36 Blood Brothers. He is also a personal trainer at revamp fitness located in Clinch MMA in Port Coquitlam BC. He is one of the up and coming welter weight fighters in B.C. Canada and is someone that you should keep an eye out for.

dejan Kajic