Archive for the ‘UTKM Principles’ Category

Knowing how to avoid danger increases your chances of survival dramatically! (source)
Audio by Jonathan Fader

The “4 stages of self-defence,” as taught by UTKM, is the basic order of operation for what you are doing when presented with conflict; be it physical, social, or otherwise. The order, moving from best option to worst, is; Avoidance, De-escalation (Defusing), Preemptive Self-defence (Strike First), Reactive Self-defence (React Last). Understanding the basics is easy, but, like all concepts, understanding when and how to apply them correctly can be trickier.

The major reason for this is the simple fact that if you do not truly understand what you are doing and you lack the experience to make a quick and correct decision (and you do not have your instructor whispering the answers into your ear), the real world situation is suddenly more complicated than it was in training.

Grasping the nuanced application of a technique, how and why it works, and when to employ it, can be the result of you being fortunate enough to possess an innate ability to understand intricate contexts, or, as is more common, it can be accomplished through consistent training. Consistent training makes up for talent by internalizing the details, purpose, and application of a given technique (or reaction in a scenario), to the point that your nervous system and decision making process will, more often than not, fire correctly under duress.

To help foster a better understanding of these key concepts, I, and others at UTKM, will be sharing real world experiences relating to the four stages. Each week we will expand upon one of the concepts and give examples.

This week it is the first and arguably most important stage: Avoidance.

“You win 100% of the fights you are not in.” – Nir Maman

First you must accept the fact that you cannot always avoid. For example, applying avoidance as a self-defence tactic for interpersonal conflict will most likely result in further problems. The concept of Avoidance simply suggests that it may be better to avoid than to confront in most situations However, and this applies particularly when it comes to bullying or active violence, sometimes the best option is to directly confront the source of conflict. After all, Krav Maga was built on the idea that sometimes running is not an option. So, please, do not interpret this stage as permission to be passive-aggressive or to never deal with life’s problems, that is not the correct application of this concept (and, honestly, if avoidance is always your chosen option in life, this may be indicative of other, deeper problems you are struggling with.)

So, lets start with some examples from my youth:

  1. It was Halloween night, and, like most young teens (I was maybe 15 or 16), I wanted to go out. In our area, big house parties were not a common occurrence, but what was all too common were hoards of teens and young adults roaming the streets like a hungry packs of wolves, looking for fun and perhaps trouble. I was with the group of friends I usually ran with at the time, and we ended up crossing paths with another pack of teens. Walking together with them, in costumes, masks, and painted faces, with candy and fireworks in hand (legal then, but illegal now, likely due to these same ravenous packs of ne’er-do-wells getting up to yearly mischief) we were on the boredom-fueled prowl. Some confident and bold, others just trying to fit in. In my case, the latter seems like it was the appropriate category. I mean, is that not what one of the best features of Halloween is; You get to dress up and pretend to be something else, something grander, something more powerful? It is after all, “All Hallow’s Eve,” where dressing up as something scary was meant to fend off the roaming spirits and demons that walk the earth on this night, every year (so the legend goes). But masks and make up can only mask you for so long. One of the older boys in a mask, I did not recognize. Clearly a leader, out front, loud and obnoxious, identified himself to me. It turned out this masked individual was someone whom I had issues with in the past. He was also dangerous, in the literal sense, much like that of a hungry alpha. He regularly got in fights (and won), regularly had police interactions, the circumstances of which were anything but innocent fun, and he “may or may not” have had ties with even more violent individuals who were known to police. He was also much bigger than me, a good bit stronger, and far more athletic. Which, through a child’s eyes, was a terrifying thing, even though I considered myself tougher than perhaps I was and, like most males, overestimated my skills. I had no training and no experience, just an over inflated ego. It was, of course, dark, and I did not like the things coming out of this guy’s mouth, nor the energy in the air. The feeling of fun turned to a dread and an uneasy churning in my gut (yet to be filled with candy.) It was uncomfortable. Concerned that the hoard was full of individuals who did not in fact like me, not to mention the de facto alpha, this was not ideal for an enjoyable night. So I decided to listen to my instincts; it was time to leave. My pace slowed, I fell to the back of the crowd, then quietly, but swiftly, faded into the dark, walking to my home a few blocks away. Later, when I was asked by my cohort where I had disappeared too, I made up some plausible story. The reality is, it was probably the right decision. Those uneasy feelings we have may be wrong sometimes, but it is often better to err on the side of caution, as we never know how things will escalate. There is one thing for certain; if you are not feeling your best, or you are uncomfortable, it can be easy to do or say the wrong thing and cause a situation to quickly shift from manageable to disastrous. So, in that case, with those personalities, avoidance was the best choice. No harm, no foul, no hospital.
  2. I was an awkward teen with no sense of who I really was yet. Which meant I was not so great with the opposite sex. So, when female friends came into the mix, it was always a joy, and an uneasy excitement (the kind only a teenage boy knows.) For a time, I frequently hung out with two girls who were a year or two younger than me. Feelings were always mixed, as I liked them each at a different time; which meant I would often go out of my way to spend time with them. Lacking experience and confidence, of course, things never went the way I had imagined. Nevertheless, it was fun at the time. Like many youths lacking good mentoring and guidance, I had trouble controlling my temper. I would never hurt anyone, but it was obvious to those all around me. Like a tornado striking down in an open field, I was loud, boisterous, and, to some, terrifying, as the fear that the destruction might come your way. (This is something I still work on daily, though with calmer mind, maturity, and fewer raging hormones it is much easier to manage.) One of these girls had a cousin, equally attractive in my eyes. Someone who I had met previously, at a random community party. She was troubled. If I am informed correctly those troubles continued to impact her in adulthood. Whenever she came around to join us, it never went well. I was POSITIVE she would intentionally say or do things to illicit my temper and unleash the tornado for her amusement. I was cold, dry air, she was warm, humid air, the inciting words and actions were the required updraft. Everyone said I was either crazy or imagining it. Nonetheless, there came a point at which I could no longer stand to be around her. So the strategy I employed was avoidance. Anytime she randomly showed up, I would find a reason to leave. If she was already there with my friends, I would make other plans. Everyone thought I was being unreasonable. However, I did not like having my fun outings turned into episodes of anger, thus, to me it seemed like the better choice. It also prevented me from hitting a breaking point and actually doing something I would regret. Despite the fact it made me look even more weird and unstable, socially, in many respects I probably made the right decision by practicing avoidance. (In hindsight, and perhaps re-framing the situation, it turns out that this girl may have actually liked me. I was told by someone, later down the road, that she was very likely trying to illicit my aggression on account of a secret, let’s say, fetish for violence. Had I been more confident, then perhaps I would have handled it differently and allowed my cold dry air to meet her warm humid air, but given my lack of knowledge at the time, avoidance was still the best strategy. Lest the tornado met the hurricane and all hell broke lose. It probably wouldn’t have been good for anyone.)
  3. If you think bullies disappear after high-school you may have practiced avoidance a little too much, and may in fact be a shut-in who is living in a perpetual state of self-imposed exile. As the internet has shown us, most people are not as stable and confident as you think, and many have bully-like tenancies at the very least; trying to use force, intimidation, or aggression to get what they want. Or, they simply have not learned to manage their anger like others and emotionally lash out at people when they are challenged, or whenever things do not go their way. I learned to deal with these people early in my youth, and as an adult I tolerate it even less. I, of course, generally employ Stage 2, deescalation, as much as I can; using my words and avoidance, as Stages 3 & 4 (outside of physical violence) are not at all appropriate in day-to-day life in a Civil society. Which means, as an adult, mastering the first two stages is that much more important. Especially when you live in a strata (eg. a condo or townhouse). Personally, I despise stratas, as it is all to easy for a bully, or someone who has a bully-like attitude, to get on the council and try to tell others how to live or act, or has a personality that leads them to take issue with being challenged (due to their perceived powers.) I personally think stratas have been nothing but a disaster, and will go the way of the dinosaurs eventually, but until then, you, like me, will likely have to deal with them at some point. Without getting too detailed, there was some conflict between me and those on a strata council. Whether I was in the wrong or the right isn’t important, sometimes I was, sometimes I wasn’t. However, several members of the council seemed to think it is acceptable and appropriate to yell and scream at people when they don’t like what was said or done. This is, of course, utterly inappropriate, and in the adult world could constitute bullying and harassment. Obviously, this is something I will not tolerate. Extensively researched, well-worded letters where sent! The goal of these letters was not to demand compliance one way or another, but rather to make it clear that I am not the kind of person to pick a fight with, verbally, physically or otherwise. Initially they got the hint and basically stopped bothering me. Later, another incident occurred where a member of council, once again, decided to scream at me. After making it clear that this was an inappropriate (and futile) tactic it didn’t seem to matter, they saw me as a threat to power, and continued. As an adult, I made the decision that, clearly, these individuals are old, unstable, and have never resolved their personal issues. I understand, but I still have no patience for it. I privately told another, calmer strata council member that their fellow’s outbursts were boarding on harassment. Moving forward, I just ignored the problem individuals and do not engage. Clearly they have problems, and those problems are not mine to solve. I made it clear that I will not be pushed around, they all seem to have gotten the hint. I avoid conflict with them, they avoid conflict with me, and we now all live in a cold peace where, so long as we don’t bother each other, all is well. While it is certainly not an ideal situation, I would rather have good relations with my neighbours, it is, in modern times, often quite impossible to get along with everyone. So, practicing a peaceful yet aware avoidance strategy will, in the end, help keep things calm, and less stressful.

Whether you are a teen, an adult, or a senior learning to practice good avoidance (and when to move to the next stage) can be extremely useful, not just in literal sense of physical self-defense, but also to help you manage the hardest part of life: Other people. These skills can be innate or learned. In my case, it seems to be more of the former, though through practice I refine them as I go along. Perhaps as an Ashkenazi Jew it is in my genes to be cautious, and avoid whenever I can, as thousands of years of oppression and living in fear is likely to impact your genetics a little bit. (Think Woody Allen, the stereotypical, nervous Ashkenazi Jew, albeit a extreme case.) Regardless of how you come to learn these skills, learning it early, and learning it well, will only mean one thing; a happier, more peaceful life. One in which your visits to the hospital due to violence are low, and your conflict related stress is that of calm waters rather than a raging storm. For if you find yourself raging too much, too often, you may find yourself battered, bruised, and broken; because you failed to manage your mental state (see awareness colour code.)

Written by Jonathan Fader

When in Doubt: Head or Groin

Posted: July 10, 2018 by urbantacticskravmaga in Krav Maga Principles, UTKM Principles

So, you’ve been practicing Krav Maga, or another self-defence style, for a while and you are starting to realize that, sometimes, under distress you cannot get the technique to work. Occasionally, it’s because the technique you are being taught works, for most people, but not you. Other times it is a matter of the physical size difference between you and your opponent. And other times it’s because, at the end of the day, under distress techniques can fail.

It is not that they are bad techniques, they are good, high percentage techniques, but the truth is techniques can and do fail; even if they are more likely to work than not.

A key thing to remember is that Techniques, in themselves, are the last step to any good Krav Maga or self defense approach. Before you have to actually use techniques, you should have practiced things like critical thinking and the stages of self-defence.

But, if you ever find yourself, either in practice or in the street, struggling to do the technique you were taught, Don’t Worry, just remember this simple principle:

When in doubt hit the groin or the head.

Football in groin.gif

No matter where you are, even if you are dazed and confused, orient yourself based on which of the two is easiest to access. If you are going for the head, punches, palm strikes and hammer fists are all good options; go for the eyes in particular.

If you are going for the groin, punches, palm strikes, and (you guessed it) hammer strikes are appropriate. If you are able to, you can also grab the groin, hard! Just know that grabbing the groin may cause a panic response in your opponent, where they try to end you, rather than a hit and release response.

Either way, if everything goes wrong, remember that techniques are at the bottom of the self-defense totem pole; they can fail, so always fall back to simple principles like going for the Groin or Head.

*Topics under any principle category (Eg. Krav Maga Principles) may be updated from time to time.  So check-in every few months to see if the posts have been updated.

On top of Straight Line vs Circular attack types, we now expand into attack patterns. It is essential to understand attack patterns to assess how your opponent is implementing the attack, at what speed, and what tempo. As a general rule, we have three attack  patterns; Threats, Committed, and Non-Committed. For bladed weapon attacks, we add a fourth called “blender mode“.

  • Threats – A threat is a static action rather than dynamic. If someone is holding a knife to you, not swinging it, this is a knife threat. If someone has grabbed you, but is only holding you, this is a threat. In both cases the assailant has yet to put any kinetic energy into their attempt, apart from the initial motion to move in close. But don’t get it wrong, if you attempt to do something and mess up, at any point their threat can become an attack.
  • Committed Attacks – A committed attack is linear. It follows a direct path from the attacker to the intended target point on a person. Committed attacks are usually due to an emotional reaction or because an attacker has decided or committed to a specific attack. The 360 defence, for example, is designed for committed attacks like the “ice pick” or “prison shank” style attack. These attacks go from outside in and downward or upward. Attacks like bear hugs are also committed, as the attacker is going from a static, to a forward grab and slam, and there is a specific attack pattern.
  • Non-Committed Attacks – Non-committed attacks are any that do not follow a linear pattern, and tend not to have the attacker’s full weight behind them. A basic Non-committed attack includes a retraction after the initial strike, rather than a telegraphed Committed attack which may lunge through or past the target. They may start in one direction, such as straight, then retract for another attack or quickly change to something else. They can come from up, down, left, or right. The intent is the same as a Committed attack, that is, to harm the intended target, but there is no set path. Hacking or slashing knife attacks are an example of Non-committed attacks. When dealing with a Non-committed attack it can be a battle of Action vs Reaction until someone wins. As such, you must reset their mental processing and do damage to them as fast as you possibly can prior to progressing to control.Because of Action vs Reaction concepts, the more your brain has to process the harder it is going to be to formulate the correct action to stop the attack or threat. Thus the more complex and non-linear an attack the harder it will be to deal with. Because of this, Committed attacks are preferable over Non-committed attacks when it comes to a defence perspective. However, from an attacking perspective, a Non-committed attack is preferable, as it has a greater chance of succeeding. If you encounter a Non-committed attack, the best idea is to simply create distance and run. If you can’t run, you must find a way, through strategy, technique, and aggression, to overwhelm your opponent.
  • Blender Mode – Blender mode is reserved for a Non-committed knife attack which employs both stabbing and slashing in quick, repeating succession. This essentially creates a wall of “blender blades” which is not safe to approach. The attacker either started like this, and is likely skilled with a knife, or you screwed up your initial defence and they went from a simple Committed lunge, to a Non-committed straight line attack, to blender mode. These are the times when it is best to use a weapon of opportunity.

*Topics under any principle category (Eg. Krav Maga Principles) may be updated from time to time.  So check-in every few months to see if the posts have been updated.

UTKM – 3 Animals you should embrace & embody

Posted: November 7, 2017 by urbantacticskravmaga in UTKM Principles
Tags: , ,

Our Slogan at UTKM is “Turning Lambs into Lions.” As humans, our greatest attribute is our intelligence, our creativeness and our ability to adapt. But that does not mean we cannot draw from the animal world and invoke their spirits in times of need. 3 animals invoke the attitudes and approaches that we would like all UTKM Students to have.

The Lion

The Lion.jpg

Image By: Rafapasta CG

The lion, as they say, is the king of the jungle. They are strong, Courageous and their warriors cry in the form of a roar can be heard for miles away. Just as our slogan indicates, no matter what your skill level we want to make you from a lamb following the herd, someone who needs the protection of the masses to feel safe, into a lion. Someone who is strong and courageous and needs no one else but themselves for their personal safety. So when you cannot run, you cannot hide, and you cannot avoid the fight, Be Strong, Be Courageous like the lion.

 

 

 

The Fox

The Fox.jpg

Image By: Rafapasta CG

The fox is the main image in the centre of our logo. They are cunning and quick. In a fox hunt, humans are only successful with a pack of hunting dogs and horses in keeping up. Foxes apply speed, agility to avoid harm. The term sly like a fox doesn’t come from nothing. They are small, silence predators that chose stealth and avoidance over direct conflict. So when you choose to avoid the fight or run from conflict, be cunning and quick like the fox and perhaps no one will even notice you were even there.

 

 

 

The Wolf

The Wolf.jpg

Image By: Rafapasta CG

The Wolf is many things, but weak is not one of them. They flourish in the pack but like the lone wolf can operate independently. They are strategic and adaptable. We are humans after all, which means we are social creatures and like the wolf, we need to be able to work in teams but not crumble should we be alone. Like the Wolf, we are also capable of strategy. Krav Maga is far more than just some techniques; it is a way of life and a strategic approach to conflict. So when you want to apply Krav Maga as a complete system, be like the wolf and strategies and adapt and you will always come out on top.